OSC Recycling & Sustainability Service Group

A reflective blog exploring recycling & sustainability initiatives at the Overseas School of Colombo

Archive for October 2017

Recycling CFL Bulbs in Colombo

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Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs) were introduced with much hype because of their energy efficiency and longer lives. Unfortunately, they are produced using a variety of dangerous elements including mercury. If they are not recycled properly, they can be hazardous to human health. The mercury in them is the most significant concern. Here in Sri Lanka I have seen old CFLs in rubbish bins and amongst smoldering fires of mixed household waste!

Thankfully there are options to recycle CFLs here in Sri Lanka. In fact Sri lanka was the first country in South Asia to set up a CFL recycling program. The Orange company has an innovative program to recycle CFLS. They collect in many lighting and electrical shops around Colombo. At our local level, consumers can take their used bulbs down to Mr. Gunatilaka. He has been taking bulbs that the RS/TTS program collects on the OSC campus.

Location of CFL recycling options + the scrap dealer who buys paper and cardboard.

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REFERENCES & FURTHER READING

Bandara, Hansani. “The CFL bulb: A double edged sword.” Sunday Times. 25 March 2012. Web.

“Compact Fluorescent Bulbs.” Wikipedia. (a fascinating account of their origins, design and technical aspects). Web.

“Sri Lanka becomes first country in South Asia to recycle compact fluorescent lamps.” EcoBuisness. 12 August 2015. Web.

 

 

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Written by recycling1011

2017-10-21 at 9:12 AM

A New Year of OSC’s R&S(TTS): 2017-18

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R&amp;S_group_1(09_17)

The 2017-18 Semester I Recycling & Sustainability/ Train to Sustain team with dedicated OSC students from the Maldives, Sri Lanka, India, the United States and China.

The 2017-18 school year is now well underway. The Recycling & Sustainability group has a new crop of participants but steady leadership with Aashika Jain and Aryaman Satish continuing as student leaders. This year there is good group of motivated participants with a significant number of Grade 8 (MYP III) students. We remain committed to our goal of reducing OSC’s ecological footprint while looking at other aspects of sustainability to address.

Globally, 2017 has witnessed unprecedented natural disasters, many of which may be linked to human-induced climate change. There have been hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, floods and droughts across the world (including here in Sri Lanka), and raging fires in North America. All of these environmental issues have human dimensions both in the cause and consequences of the disaster. In a significant development  China has decided to ban the import of recycled plastic. This has serious consequences to small countries like Sri Lanka and large countries such as the USA that depend on China to send their recycled plastic to. Exactly how this impacts the recycling industry here and if it results in more waste plastic being untreated is yet to be seen.

The local and national challenge of solid waste management remains a significant concern.  The Meethotamulla dump collapse on April 14th 2017 brought the issue into the limelight here in Sri Lanka. There was growing public resolve that something be done. The government’s Central Environment Authority (CEA) ordered a ban on a variety of plastic bags as of September 1st  but this has not been successfully implemented. There is confusion about the ban and as of now you will see most commercial establishments generously giving out plastic bags. There are proposals to dump waste near Puttalam but these do not address the root problem of actually reducing the inputs.

Here are on campus we are exploring several initiatives to further reduce the campus’ ecological footprint.

  • Better separate and deal with food waste. One idea is to invest in a bio-digester. We have hesitated to push for this solution because we don’t see commitment to having a maintenance employee assigned to take care of the job.
  • Do a better job with recycling e-waste. The student leaders are looking a running a CAS Project that identifies a better way to deal with electronic waste. One thought it is that if we find a place to deal with it the school could become a community center for people to bring e-waste to. UNDP and Dialog have ideas on recycling e-waste in Sri Lanka.
  • Raise awareness on the campus. In particular, about using bins to segregate waste better.

*text & images by RS&S faculty supervisor Ian Lockwood

REFERENCES & FURTHER READING

“China tries to keep foreign rubbish out.” The Economist. 23 August 2017. Web.

Christopher, Chrishanthi. “Drowning in waste: Garbage problems out of control. Sunday Times. 19 June 2016. Web.

Christopher, Chrishanthi. “Measures in the bag to cut vast polythene waste at supermarkets.” Sunday Times. 6 August 2017. Web.

Christopher, Chrishanthi. “Plastic industry claims and lobbying intensify, but regulator insists ban stays.” Sunday Times. 20 August 2017. Web.

Hettiarachchi, Kumudini. “Playing football with Colombo’s garbage.” Sunday Times. 14 May 2017. Web.

Kotelawala, Himal. “Polythene Ban: Should We Celebrate Just Yet?” Roar. 13 July 2017. Web.

Jayawardana, Sandun. “Govt. waste deep in its (mis)management and disposal.” Sunday Times. 26 June 2017. Web. (has Buddhika from Viridis in it)

Nafeel, Nushka. “Banning Plastic.” Daily News. 14 September 2017. Web.

“Polythene Ban Goodbye for Ever? Or Only a Temporary Measure?” Sunday Observer. 10 September 2017. Web.

 

Written by recycling1011

2017-10-20 at 3:17 PM